Saturday, 22 February 2014

Building Done.


Ok Not quite finished it still has filler and Paint to go yet, but at least it gives the overall look, size and shape so come Monday I should be able to crack on with the next stage.

As you can see I took my favourite tools of destruction. Two scalpels 2 steel rules and engineering square. I only used 1 scalpel though with a 10a blade for those that care about such things. Oh only me then. I set about the Grey Board. For those of you who don't know Grey board is the cardboard version of MDF! It's cheap and versatile and robust and comes in different thicknesses.

 Working from a scrap of 3mm mdf for the base. This was cut square and sanded to remove any tool marks. I used both a foot and camel mounted figure to gauge the building height and size and height of the windows. The Grey board I had was also 3mm thick so I decided to double up on the layers to give it a more thermally massive appearance.
 I started by cutting the front and back and getting them about how I wanted them. I then cut the sides making sure that they were all the same height. Yes I know common sense, but still worth stating.

 I then assembled the basic box like structure. Using plenty of Resin W (PVA white wood glue). I allowed it to dry overnight.
 You can see I left an area at the back. It's not too neat at this stage as filler and paint can work wonders where my patience and inaccuracy are lacking. So no biggie! Again checking the sizes at every stage as you don't want to get it wrong if you can help it. Totally common sense.
 In the Morning I added the rear section to make the building "L" shaped and the roof on the main section. I gave this plenty of time to dry..... Ok I took a break and watched the Curling!
After the curling I added the roof to the rear section. I deliberately put the roof level lower to make this parapet deeper. This was done as I wanted the building to look like it had had a second stage so it would look like it was made at a different time. And then allowed a second night of Drying.
 Tomorrow I will go to my first wargames show of the year so expect a loot post tomorrow evening. It's not that I have a very large shopping list at all. But there are a few things I do intend to purchase. Possibly a few things for 20mm Vietnam games, possibly a few Victorian/steam punk Items, maybe some scenery and maybe some rules, definitely a few pots of paint! But we shall see what takes my fancy on the day.
So until tomorrow night take care and have some fun, oh and enjoy any SUN while you can.

All the best Clint.

21 comments:

  1. Great work! I'm thinking about starting to work on my terreain again as well, and I've decided over the past couple of years that opening roofs and interiors are over rated. They look awesome if done good, but as the materials all curl, it just ends up annoying.
    The great thing about "Afghan" buildings is you have the great horizontal roofs to put figures on.

    Does this count as a compound, or you'll it modular and larger?

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    1. No not really a compound, but a free standing building. It can represent a building anywhere in North Africa or Afghanistan or even parts of India. I can only encourage you to make terrain (if you have any chance of storage).

      I agree about taking roves off. IF you nee interior action I would do it on a different board where you can have room to move the figures.

      Thank you Mathyoo. All the Best Mate.

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  2. Very nice work Clint. Looking forward to seeing the completed article

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    1. Thank you Loki. I am looking forward to using it with the Rejects!

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  3. Great start , Clint! I actually seen some Afghan farmers make a whole addition to a home while I was in a hide. Besides being very salty, the soil dries like concrete. They used water and some grasses mixed in and tromped about. They also used poles for the roof frame. They packed buckets of the mud in rising layers. In 120° heat and three days, they built an addon room and a lean to enclosure for the goats. About a week later, you couldn't even tell it was new.

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    1. These explanations of yours are like gold. Thank you David.

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  4. Very Good Clint a great start to the buildings. Where do you pick up your board and stuff from?

    David that is a wicked story :)

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    1. Grey board used to be available from Picture framers, but no longer. You will have to go to a craft shop or alas buy it online. If you want to know what it's like before buying any. It's the type of card on the back of sketch books but can be bought in multi thicknesses.

      Thank you Simon.

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  5. Great stuff Clint
    I'm a big fan of home made terrain and like this one a lot. I appreciate the multi-purpose/multi-theatre applications. I haven't used (or even seen) grey board but will keep an eye open. I tend to use foam core board.
    Sorry about the curling gold medal match, but GB did well to get two medals in curling. What happens if the Scots vote to leave?
    Cheers
    PD

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    1. Thank you Peter. Check the comment above for where you can find Grey board. It is harder to work than foam core but more robust.

      If Scotland do leave there will be lots of changes, Curling being the least of them. It will be interesting to see if the Union Flag changes.

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    2. Clint
      I'll keep an eye open for the board.
      We Canadians have survived the referendum process a few times, and I can very well appreciate the changes involved.
      Cheers
      PD

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  6. I really like this, Clint. It is always worth stating the common sense approach to making model buildings. Oh, and I wouldn't worry about having the roofs fixed in place. Only a stickler for detail like me would bother with the building interior. :)

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    1. Thank you Bryan. I know the rigors associated with models for my wargames club. Strong is favoured so no interiors will be attempted.

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  7. That building looks great! I'm interested in seeing the finished product.

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    1. Thank you Mister Monk. filled all the gaps now and so ready for paint on Monday or Tuesday.

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  8. Great stuff Clint, I appreciate the step by step approach, knowing full well how difficult it is to stop-start. I like the "L" shape too, rectangular box buildings are a bore, even if they're necessaryat times.
    (I too use 10A blades)

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  9. I also like to use no:11 Blades as well. (or 25s or 26s if using a no 4 Handle) I'm such a geek having preferred scalpel blades for each different handle size. Thanks Jo .

    I was going to do a lean to on the building but with no need for a sloped roof it just turned into an extension!

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  10. You made that look incredibly easy Clint - a wonderful build.

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    1. To be honest it's a struggle at times working with grey board, just because of the thicknesses. But the thicknesses mean the walls will stand up on there own! Thank you Michael.

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  11. That looks pretty solid! 2 thicknesses of grey board should make it all but indestructible, right?

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    1. Should be able to bear the weight of an average man.... maybe not an average wargamer. Perhaps I over engineered it!Thank you Hugh.

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